chikuzen-ni: easy, peasy, japanesey.

this post is going to start with a little bit of unadulterated praise.

most chefs who prepare washoku in a restaurant setting have a truly incredible attention to detail, which can encompass everything from the taste of their dish to the geometry of their plating.  as is the case with a lot of facets of life in japan, there seems to be a tried and true method behind most japanese recipes.  some of these methods are easily explained and demonstrated, while others seem, for lack of a better word, almost magical.

i often find myself in childlike awe when watching a few of my japanese friends cook their specialty dishes.  watching pros prepare foods like slow-simmered fish heads, deep sea angler hot pot, or dozen-egg rolled omelettes is mind-blowing.  of course the end product tastes great.  but the freshness and simplicity of the ingredients they use necessitates a borderline superhuman culinary sense.  a culinary sense which can only be acquired through (what i assume to be) trial and error.

that being said, i am not japanese.  i have the attention to detail required to cook complex japanese food, and on occasion i even use it.  but i like to cook on the fly.  i’m not much one for patient measuring, complex kitchen tools, or difficult techinques.  i have a very deliberate personal style when it comes to cooking.

sometimes, that style involves getting drunk, nearly cutting off my fingers, forgetting that the stove is on, and starting a fire in my kitchen.

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tofu and avocado soup: sometimes, less is more.

tofu and… avocado?  has the poor man finally lost his mind?

while the answer to that question might be “yes,” this is still a pretty dang tasty recipe i threw together the other day.

i am a firm believer that some of the world’s best soups are those that are just as good hot as they are cold, which is certainly the case of some of my favorites.  this soup in particular was inspired by none other than vichyssoise, one of america’s most classic soups.

as with some of japan’s greatest foods, the key to this soup is its mildness.  it contains no shocking flavors, no expensive ingredients, and requires no complex cooking methods at all.  literally any person with a food processor or a blending wand can make it.  and therein lies its beauty.

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hakuna frittata: it’s a problem-free philosophy.

when i remembered all the delicious edibles sitting in fridge last weekend, it was pretty close to too late.  i had some broccoli, almost a whole head of garlic that was ready to sprout, and a few slices of well-marbled bacon.  to throw away such a bounty would have been a travesty.  i decided to act quickly.

i thought, “i’ll make frittata.”

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